Sunday, January 25, 2015

Ezmeli kebabs recipe

Ezmeli kebabs

Ezme (Turkish-style tomato salsa) is one of the most popular dishes in Turkish cuisine, and can be served as a mezze or salad. The most important trick in making this recipe is to chop all the ingredients finely with a sharp knife. Ezmeli kebab is one of the traditional tastes of Gaziantep – a city located south east of Anatolia.

Serves 4
Preparation 30min
Cooking 30min
Skill level Easy

By
Somer Sivrioglu

Ingredients

1 kg leg of lamb, cut into 4 cm cubes
200 g lamb fat (bunting), for the skewers, cut into 4 cm flat pieces
1 tbsp olive oil
2 tsp salt

Ezme

6 medium ripe tomatoes, deseeded, quartered
4 red Turkish sweet peppers or smaller bullhorn chillies, deseeded, cut into large pieces (see Note)
1 bunch flat-leaf parsley, chopped
3 medium red onions, coarsely chopped
3 garlic cloves, chopped
1 tbsp Isot pepper (burnt Turkish Urfa peppers) or medium-hot chilli flakes (see Note)
1 tbsp capsicum paste (see Note)
50 ml (2½ tbsp) pomegranate molasses (found at Middle Eastern, Greek and Turkish markets)
100 ml extra virgin olive oil
½ lemon, juiced
1 tbsp sea salt, or to taste

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

The following recipe has been tested and edited by SBS Food and may differ slightly from the podcast.

You will need to begin this recipe 1 day ahead.

Marinating time Overnight

Place the lamb, fat, olive oil and salt in a bowl. Toss to combine. Cover and place in the fridge to marinate overnight. Remove from fridge at least 1 hour before cooking.

Preheat a charcoal barbecue or chargrill on medium-high heat. To make the ezme, soak 2 skewers in water, then thread the tomatoes onto skewers. Place over barbecue or chargrill until cooked through and softened, set aside to cool.

On a chopping board, combine the cooked tomato, Turkish peppers or bullhorn chillies, parsley, red onion and garlic. Finely chop to form a salsa, then drain excess liquid and place in a mixing bowl. Add the Isot pepper, capsicum paste, pomegranate molasses, olive oil, lemon juice and sea salt. Toss well to combine. 

Cook the lamb skewers over a charcoal barbecue or chargrill for 8-10 minutes or until cooked to you liking. When cooked, remove any bunting fat between the lamb cubes and serve with the ezme.

Note
• Red Turkish peppers (when in season), Isot pepper and capsicum paste are available from Turkish food stores.

Photography by Alan Benson. Styling by Michelle Noerianto.

Recipe related to Ezmeli kebabs recipe:

Chicken Shish Kabob Recipe! Turkish Style Chicken Kabob | Kabob Chicken - Traditional  Chicken Shish Kebabs | Shish Kabob with Yogurt Sauce and Lemon-Olive Couscous | Shish Taouk (Chicken Kebab Recipe) | BBQ Lamb Kabobs | Shish Tawook

Saturday, January 24, 2015

Chicken Shish Kabob Recipe! Turkish Style Chicken Kabob

Chicken Kabob

Ingredients
 
4 – 6  boneless chicken breasts

1 cup of milk

2 tbs pepper paste

1 tbs paprika

1/4 tsp cinnamon

1/4 tsp 7 spices

1 tsp cayenne pepper

4-5 cloves of garlic mashed

1/4 cup of vegetable oil

1 lemon juice

1/4 tsp salt or to your taste

Soaked wooden skewers (soak up to an hour)

Cut the chicken into cubes, wash and dry. Then set aside.

Directions

Meanwhile, bring a large bowl, add the milk, and the ingredients, whisk & mix well to combine, marinade should be creamy like consistency.  Add in the chicken cubes, mix and cover all the chicken with the marinade. Marinate the chicken up to four hours or overnight in the fridge.

Heat & oil the grill if grilling indoor, skewer the chicken kabob about 5-6 chicken cubes for each skewer, you can add onions if you like, green or red pepper between the chicken cubes.  You can also skewer the vegetables and grill separately.

Grill the chicken for a few minutes on each side, rotate the chicken to make sure it is cooked well.

I like to serve the chicken kabob with garlic sauce and pickles as sandwiches with a side of  french fries for lunch.   For dinner I like to plate the chicken with rice pilaf or bulgur pilaf, grilled vegetables such as tomatoes, grilled onions and grilled peppers.

I hope you make this chicken kabob recipe for your family and friends, and please leave us your comments.

Enjoy!

Source: http://themediterraneanchef.com

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Bulgur Wheat Salad (Kamouneh) recipe


Ingredients

1 cup of bulgur wheat number one

1 lb of tomatoes ( I like vine ripened for this recipe)

1 – 2 tbs of tomato paste

1 tbs of Kibbeh Spice (kamouneh)

1 tsp of cayenne pepper

1 white onion diced

1 bunch of mint chopped

1/2 cup of extra virgin olive oil

1/4 tsp salt or to taste

Directions

In a large bowl add the bulgur wheat and the tomato paste and mix together by rubbing well in the palm of your hands, set aside.  Meanwhile dice the tomatoes, chop the onion finely, add into the bulgur.  Roughly chop the mint leaves.  Mix all the ingredients together.  Add in the kibbeh spice (kamouneh spice), the cayenne pepper, salt and olive oil.  Gently toss and serve immediately.  You can always adjust the salt and the spices according to your taste.

Please make this recipe for your family & friends and don’t forget to leave us a comment.

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Thursday, January 22, 2015

Spiced burghul wrapped in vine leaves (yaprak sarma) recipe


What we call stuffed vine leaves, dolma, in the UK are thought of as wrapped vine leaves, sarma, in Turkey. Dolma is only used as a term to describe things which are stuffed in Turkish-like hollowed out courgettes (zucchini) or tomatoes, or even stuffed squid. Whatever you’d like to call them, these vine leaves, filled with bright red, slightly fiery burghul (bulgur) wheat, are delicious. They are also easy to assemble.

Makes 30
Preparation 40min
Cooking 1hr
Skill level Mid

By
Rebecca Seal

Ingredients

250 g (9 oz) pack preserved vine leaves
150 g (5 oz/scant 1 cup) burghul (bulgur) wheat
1 onion, finely chopped
olive oil
2 tbsp Turkish hot red pepper paste, or 1 very finely chopped red (bell) pepper plus chilli flakes to taste
1 tsp pomegranate molasses
2 tbsp finely chopped flat-leaf parsley
plain Turkish or Greek-style yoghurt, to serve

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

Vine leaves can be very salty, so be sure to rinse and blanch them. You can also make this dish with just-blanched chard leaves.

Remove the vine leaves from their packet and rinse under cold running water. Bring a large pan of water to the boil. Slide the vine leaves into the water and blanch for 2 minutes. Drain, rinse again in cold water and drain again.

Put the burghul wheat in a bowl. Just cover with boiling water and leave to soak for 10 minutes, until partially softened. Drain, if necessary, and fluff up with a fork.

Meanwhile, soften the onion in 1 tablespoon of olive oil for 5–10 minutes, stirring, over a low heat until translucent. Then add the red pepper paste, or chopped pepper and chilli flakes, to taste. Cook very gently until pulpy; 5 minutes if using the paste, 10 minutes if using fresh peppers. Add the pomegranate molasses, stir and then add the soaked burghul. Cook for 1 minute, then remove from the heat. Add the parsley.

To stuff the leaves, place a whole, intact leaf on a flat surface with the stem end facing towards you. Remove the stem. Place about 1 tablespoon of the burghul mixture in the middle of the leaf, just above where the stem was. Lift the bottom sections of the leaf up and over the filling, then bring the side edges in over it too. Roll the leaf away from you, folding and catching the edges of the leaf neatly into the roll as you go. When you have rolled the whole leaf up, all the edges should be tucked in to the roll and no filling should be visible. Repeat with more leaves and filling (you should be able to make at least 30 and have a few small or damaged leaves left over).

Use any damaged or particularly small leaves to line the base of a large saucepan or flameproof casserole with a lid. Tightly pack the rolls into the pan, each with the loose edge of the leaf underneath, to prevent it unraveling while cooking. When all the rolls are in the pan, weigh them down with a plate (otherwise they will float and unwrap themselves). Then pour in enough boiling water to just cover the rolls.

Bring to the boil, then turn the heat right down, cover and simmer very gently for 30 minutes. When the rolls have cooked and with the plate still in place, carefully drain the water away. Using tongs, remove the rolls from the pan and transfer to a plate to cool. Serve cold as part of a meze, with a little plain yoghurt.

Istanbul: Recipes From the Heart of Turkey, Rebecca Seal (Hardie Grant, $45, hbk)

From sbs.com.au

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Aubergine puree topped with lamb stew (hünkar beğendi) recipe


This is a rich and satisfying Ottoman dish of lamb stew on a bed of aubergine and cheese, and it smells progressively more delicious as it slowly cooks, making it harder and harder to resist dipping a corner of bread into the pot! The name means the Sultan’s Delight (or the Sultan liked it), and there are two stories about its origins: one is that it was created for a sultan in the 1600s who did indeed like it; the other is that it was served in the 19th century Sultan’s court to Napoleon’s wife, who liked it so much she requested the recipe (the chef refused to give it to her). A salad of bitter leaves with a sharp dressing goes nicely here, or some winter greens.

Serves 4
Preparation 30min
Cooking 2hr 40min
Skill level   Mid

By
Rebecca Seal

Ingredients

For the lamb stew

850 g (1 lb 14 oz) boneless stewing lamb (shoulder, shank or leg), cut into 2.5 cm (1 in) dice, excess fat removed
1 onion, finely chopped
pinch of salt
4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
¾ tbsp Turkish tomato paste or concentrated tomato puree (paste)
2–3 fresh tomatoes, peeled, deseeded and roughly chopped
¼ tsp dried thyme
¼ tsp dried oregano
200 ml (7 fl oz/generous ¾ cup) hot water
1 tbsp chopped flat-leaf parsley

For the aubergine puree

4 large aubergines (eggplants), trimmed
¾ tbsp lemon juice
30 g (1 oz/1½ tbsp) butter
30 g (1 oz/¼ cup) plain (all-purpose) flour
350 ml (12 fl oz/1⅓ cups) milk
60 g (2 oz/½ cup) grated kasseri, parmesan, comté or other hard cheese
salt and freshly ground black pepper

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

Prepare the lamb. Brown the meat in a deep saucepan with a lid, or a deep flameproof casserole, over a high heat and in batches (if the pan is too crowded the meat will stew rather than caramelise and be less tasty).

Turn the heat down to low, return all the meat to the pan and add the onion and salt. Allow the onion to soften and become translucent for 10 minutes, stirring to prevent sticking, then add the garlic and cook, stirring frequently, for 2 minutes.

Add the tomato paste and cook, stirring again, for a further 2 minutes.

Finally add the fresh tomatoes, dried herbs and hot water (the meat should be just covered, so add a little more water if it is not). Stir thoroughly and cover. Simmer for about 2 hours, checking frequently that the sauce is not sticking or reducing too fast – add splashes of hot water whenever necessary to prevent this. The stew is ready when the tomatoes and liquid have reduced and thickened and the meat is just beginning to fall apart.

About 40 minutes before the stew is fully cooked, start the aubergine purée (don’t worry if timings over-run – the stew will keep happily with a lid on. You could even make it the day before). Either thoroughly char and blacken their skins for 10 minutes directly over a gas ring or place under a grill (broiler) set to its highest temperature, and allow the skins to blacken and wrinkle, turning them regularly. (If you prefer a less smoky flavour, grill or broil them more slowly, further from the heat.) When the skins are charred, set them aside in a bowl and splash over the lemon juice. Allow them to cool and then scoop out the flesh by splitting each one down the middle with a spoon and using it to gently scrape out the insides. Pull out any large strands of seeds and discard, roughly chop the flesh and place in a colander to drain.

Meanwhile melt the butter in a saucepan big enough to take all the milk and the cooked aubergines, over a low heat. Warm the milk in a separate pan. When the butter is foaming but not brown, add the flour. Mix well and cook over a very low heat for 2 minutes. Slowly add the hot milk, a quarter at a time, stirring to incorporate each time. (Don’t add it all at once as the sauce will become lumpy.) When all the milk has been added the sauce should be thick enough to just coat the back of a spoon. If it is too thick, add a little more milk and whisk it in. Add the cheese and the chopped aubergine and cook for 2–3 minutes over the lowest possible heat. Taste and adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper.

Just before serving, stir the parsley into the lamb stew and taste to check the seasoning. Spoon the hot aubergine purée in a thick layer onto a warm serving dish and top with the lamb stew, or serve as individual portions in bowls.

Istanbul: Recipes From the Heart of Turkey, Rebecca Seal (Hardie Grant, $45, hbk)

From sbs.com.au

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Monday, January 19, 2015

Raw minced lamb with burghul and spices (kibbeh nayeh) recipe

kibbeh nayeh

Kibbeh nayeh is a rustic, authentic Lebanese dish of raw minced lamb, burghul (cracked wheat) and spices. This secret to this much loved Lebanese dish is using only the freshest meat that is finely minced on the day, and it should be eaten the day it is made.

Serves 6
Preparation 20min
Skill level Easy

By
Charmaine Nicholson

Ingredients

1 white onion
2-3 mint sprigs
500 g very fresh minced lamb
135 g (¾ cup) fine burghul, washed, drained
½ tsp salt
¼ tsp ground black pepper
½ tsp allspice
mint leaves, chopped, to garnish
extra virgin olive oil, to garnish

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.
Instructions

Chop half of the onion and place in a food processor with the mint sprigs and pulse a few times. Add 125 g of the minced lamb to onion mixture and process to a paste.

Place the lamb paste, remaining minced lamb, burghul, salt, ground black pepper and allspice in a large bowl and knead the mixture with your fingers. (Keep a bowl of iced water nearby to dip your hands in while kneading to prevent the mixture sticking to them.)

Turn out kibbeh onto a large plate and flatten to about 2 cm thick.

Scatter over the mint leaves, drizzle with extra virgin olive oil and serve immediately with remaining white onion sliced, tabouleh, hummus and labneh. You can eat all these elements together with Lebanese bread.

As seen in Feast magazine, Issue 5, pg162.

Photography by Peter Georgakopoulos.

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Sunday, January 18, 2015

Madlouka Recipe

Madlouka Recipe

Ingredients
 
1/3 cup semolina
1 sachet Dream Whip
2 tbsp butter
1 cup milk
1 cup sugar
2 cups ground pistachios
2 sachets Dream Whip whipped with 2 cup milk
Ground pistachios for garnish

Preparation:
  1. Melt butter in a pan over medium heat then add semolina and Dream Whip powder.
  2. Stir to toast evenly.
  3. Add milk and continue stirring until mixture becomes a sticky paste.
  4. Add sugar all at once and continue stirring until it thickens again into a paste.
  5. Remove from heat and add ground pistachios to the pan and mix well to incorporate. Cool.
  6. Spread in a shallow serving dish and top with cream and pistachios.

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Muhallabieh | Baklava | Knafeh | Katayef | Nummoora | Znoud Elsit

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